Treatment

Evidenced Based Treatment Approaches For Children and Adolescents Exposed to Violence and Trauma: The most effective form of clinical treatment is evidence-based, which means that it has been proven through research to be effective. The following are three evidence-based treatments for childhood exposure to violence offered in the greater Portland area.

Child Parent Psychotherapy (CPP)

  • Evidence-based trauma treatment for children ages 0-6 and their caregivers.
  • The focus of the treatment is to help the child and the caregiver reconnect and heal from past trauma. This healing can lead to decreased anxiety and more confident and trusting relationships.
  • Treatment usually lasts up to a year and incorporates the use of play, parenting and safety skills and attachment based interventions.
  • This treatment uses theories of attachment, early childhood development, and trauma to direct interventions.

Child & Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI)

  • Evidence-based trauma treatment for children ages 7-18 and their caregivers.
  • Average treatment period is 4-8 sessions.
  • Includes caregivers and family as a whole.
  • Delivered soon after a traumatic event.
  • Reduces negative reactions or symptoms related to the traumatic event.
  • Strengthens communication between caregiver and child.
  • Helps families to learn and practice skills to help reduce trauma reactions.
  • Helps families address practical needs such as safety, legal issues or medical care
  • Assesses whether child needs longer-term treatment.
  • Skill-based treatment components teach methods for relaxation, coping and safety skills to both children and caregiver.
  • Treatment is short-term, usually completed within 2-6 months.

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

  • Evidence-based trauma treatment for children ages 5-18.
  • Integrates cognitive and behavioral interventions within trauma theoretical framework.
  • Includes parent/caregiver involvement.
  • Targets symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which often co-occurs with depression and behavioral problems. The intervention also addresses issues commonly experienced by traumatized children, such as poor self-esteem, difficulty trusting others, mood instability and self-injurious behaviors including substance abuse.
  • Skill-based treatment components teach methods for relaxation, coping and safety skills to both children and caregiver.
  • Treatment is short-term, usually completed within 2-6 months.

For more information about clinical treatments for children who have been exposed to violence and/or trauma, contact Dory Hacker, PDC Outreach Coordinator/Clinician at (207) 874 -1030.